TEST CATALOG ORDERING & RESULTS SPECIMEN HANDLING CUSTOMER SERVICE EDUCATION & INSIGHTS
Test Catalog

Test ID: XALDZ    
X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy, Full Gene Analysis, Varies

Useful For Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Confirming a diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

 

Identifying a variant in the ABCD1 gene

Genetics Test Information Provides information that may help with selection of the correct genetic test or proper submission of the test request

Testing includes full gene sequencing of the ABCD1 gene.

Testing Algorithm Delineates situations when tests are added to the initial order. This includes reflex and additional tests.

If skin biopsy is received, fibroblast culture and cryopreservation for biochemical studies will be added at an additional charge.

 

See Newborn Screen Follow-up for X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy in Special Instructions.

 

For more information, see Newborn Screening Act Sheet X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy: Increased Very Long Chain Fatty Acids in Special Instructions.

Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a peroxisomal disease characterized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the white matter, adrenocortical insufficiency, and abnormal plasma concentrations of very long chain fatty acids. The phenotypic expression of X-ALD varies widely. The phenotypes can be subdivided into 3 main categories: childhood cerebral form, adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), and Addison disease only. The childhood cerebral form has onset of symptoms between ages 4 and 8, beginning with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder-like symptoms with progressive cognitive, behavior, vision, hearing, and motor deterioration. AMN usually presents in males in their late twenties as progressive paraparesis, sexual dysfunction, sphincter disturbances, and abnormalities in adrenocortical function. The Addison only phenotype typically presents by age 7.5 with adrenocortical insufficiency without significant neurological involvement. Most of these patients eventually develop AMN. Some female carriers may experience mild AMN symptoms with a later age of onset.

 

The phenotype cannot be predicted by very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) plasma concentration or by the nature of the genetic variant. The same variant can be associated with each of the known phenotypes. Different phenotypes often occur within a family.

 

POX / Fatty Acid Profile, Peroxisomal (C22-C26), Serum testing is the preferred first-tier screening method for X-ALD. This is abnormal in 99% of affected males and 85% of carrier females. Sequencing of the ABCD1 gene is available to confirm the diagnosis of X-ALD, improve carrier detection, and assist with prenatal diagnosis.

Reference Values Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

An interpretive report will be provided.

Interpretation Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

All detected alterations are evaluated according to American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics recommendations.(1) Variants are classified based on known, predicted, or possible pathogenicity and reported with interpretive comments detailing their potential or known significance.

Cautions Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

A small percentage of individuals who have a diagnosis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) may have a variant that is not identified by this method (eg, large deletions/duplications, promoter alterations, deep intronic alterations). The absence of variants, therefore, does not eliminate the possibility of the diagnosis of X-ALD. For testing asymptomatic individuals it is important to first document the presence of an ABCD1 gene variant in an affected family member.

 

In some cases, DNA alterations of undetermined significance may be identified.

 

Rare alterations exist that could lead to false-negative or false-positive results. If results obtained do not match the clinical findings, additional testing should be considered.

 

Test results should be interpreted in the context of clinical findings, family history, and other laboratory data. Errors in our interpretation of results may occur if information given is inaccurate or incomplete.

Clinical Reference Recommendations for in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Richards S, Aziz N, Bale S, et al: Standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants: a joint consensus recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Genet Med. 2015 May;17(5):405-424

2. Moser HW, Mahmood A, Raymond GV: X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Nat Clin Pract Neurol. 2007 Mar;3(3):140-151

3. Wang Y, Busin R, Reeves C, et al: X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: ABCD1 de novo mutations and mosaicism. Mol Genet Metab. 2011 Sep-Oct;104(1-2):160-166

4. Kemp S, Berger J, Aubourg P: X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: Clinical, metabolic, genetic and pathophysiological aspects. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2012 Sept;1822(9):1465-1474

Special Instructions Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test