Test Catalog

Test Id : ZNS

Zinc, Serum

Useful For
Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Detecting zinc deficiency

Special Instructions
Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test

Method Name
A short description of the method used to perform the test

Dynamic Reaction Cell-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS)

NY State Available
Indicates the status of NY State approval and if the test is orderable for NY State clients.

Yes

Reporting Name
Lists a shorter or abbreviated version of the Published Name for a test

Zinc, S

Aliases
Lists additional common names for a test, as an aid in searching

Zn (Zinc) Serum

Specimen Type
Describes the specimen type validated for testing

Serum

Specimen Required
Defines the optimal specimen required to perform the test and the preferred volume to complete testing

Patient Preparation: High concentrations of gadolinium, iodine, and barium are known to interfere with most metals tests. If gadolinium-, iodine-, or barium-containing contrast media has been administered, a specimen should not be collected for at least 96 hours.

Supplies:

-Metal Free B-D Tube (No Additive), 6 mL (T184)

-Metal Free Specimen Vial (T173)

Collection Container/Tube: 6-mL Plain, royal blue-top Vacutainer plastic trace element blood collection tube

Submission Container/Tube: 7-mL Metal-free, screw-capped, polypropylene vial

Specimen Volume: 0.8 mL

Collection Instructions:

1. Allow the specimen to clot for 30 minutes after collection; then centrifuge the specimen to separate serum from the cellular fraction. Serum must be removed from cellular fraction within 4 hours of specimen collection. Avoid hemolysis.

2. Remove the stopper. Carefully pour specimen into a metal-free, polypropylene vial, avoiding transfer of the cellular components of blood. Do not insert a pipet into the serum to accomplish transfer, and do not ream the specimen with a wooden stick to assist with serum transfer.

3. See Trace Metals Analysis Specimen Collection and Transport in Special Instructions for complete instructions.

Special Instructions
Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test

Forms

If not ordering electronically, complete, print, and send a General Request (T239) with the specimen.

Specimen Minimum Volume
Defines the amount of sample necessary to provide a clinically relevant result as determined by the Testing Laboratory

0.2 mL

Reject Due To
Identifies specimen types and conditions that may cause the specimen to be rejected

Gross hemolysis Reject
Gross lipemia OK
Gross icterus Reject

Specimen Stability Information
Provides a description of the temperatures required to transport a specimen to the performing laboratory, alternate acceptable temperatures are also included

Specimen Type Temperature Time Special Container
Serum Refrigerated (preferred) 28 days METAL FREE
Ambient 28 days METAL FREE
Frozen 28 days METAL FREE

Useful For
Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Detecting zinc deficiency

Clinical Information
Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

Zinc is an essential element; it is a critical cofactor for carbonic anhydrase, alkaline phosphatase, RNA and DNA polymerases, alcohol dehydrogenase, and many other physiologically important proteins. The peptidases, kinases, and phosphorylases are most sensitive to zinc depletion. Zinc is a key element required for active wound healing.

 

Zinc depletion occurs either because it is not absorbed from the diet (excess copper or iron interfere with absorption) or it is lost after absorption. Dietary deficiency may be due to absence (parenteral nutrition), or because the zinc in the diet is bound to phytate (fiber) and not available for absorption. Excess copper and iron in the diet (eg, iron supplements) interfere with zinc uptake. Once absorbed, the most common route of loss is via exudates from open wounds or gastrointestinal loss. Zinc depletion occurs in burn patients who lose zinc in the exudates from their burn sites. Hepatic cirrhosis causes excess loss of zinc by enhancing renal excretion. Other diseases that cause low serum zinc are ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, regional enteritis, sprue, intestinal bypass, neoplastic disease, and increased catabolism induced by anabolic steroids. The conditions of anorexia and starvation also result in low zinc levels.

 

Zinc excess is not of major clinical concern. The popular American habit of taking megavitamins (containing huge doses of zinc) produces no direct toxicity problems. Much of this zinc passes through the gastrointestinal tract and is excreted in the feces. The excess fraction that is absorbed is excreted in the urine. The only known effect of excessive zinc ingestion relates to the fact that zinc interferes with copper absorption, which can lead to hypocupremia.

Reference Values
Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

0-10 years: 0.60-1.20 mcg/mL

> or =11 years: 0.66-1.10 mcg/mL

Interpretation
Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

Normal serum zinc is 0.66 to 1.10 mcg/mL.

 

Burn patients with acrodermatitis may have zinc as low as 0.4 mcg/mL; these patients respond quickly to zinc supplementation.

 

Elevated serum zinc is of minimal clinical interest.

Cautions
Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

Hemolyzed specimens will cause false elevation of serum zinc levels.

 

It is essential that the specimen is collected following the trace metals collection procedure (see Trace Metals Analysis Specimen Collection and Transport in Special Instructions.)

Clinical Reference
Recommendations for in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Tucker SB, Schroeter AL, Brown PW Jr, McCall JT: Acquired zinc deficiency: cutaneous manifestations typical of acrodermatitis enteropathica. JAMA. 1976;235:2399-2402

2. Skelton JA, Havens PL, Werlin SL: Nutrient deficiencies in tube-fed children. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2006;45(1):37-41

3. Zorbas YG, Kakuris KK, Neofitov IA, Afoninos NI: Zinc utilization in zinc-supplemented and-unsupplemented healthy subjects during and after prolonged hypokinesis. Tr Elem Electro. 2008;25:60-68

4. Rifai N, Horwath AR, Wittwer CT, eds. Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics. 6th ed. Elsevier; 2018

Special Instructions
Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test

Method Description
Describes how the test is performed and provides a method-specific reference

Zinc in serum is analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in dynamic reaction cell mode using  gallium as an internal standard and a salt matrix calibration.(Unpublished Mayo method)

PDF Report
Indicates whether the report includes an additional document with charts, images or other enriched information

No

Day(s) Performed
Outlines the days the test is performed. This field reflects the day that the sample must be in the testing laboratory to begin the testing process and includes any specimen preparation and processing time before the test is performed. Some tests are listed as continuously performed, which means that assays are performed multiple times during the day.

Monday through Saturday

Report Available
The interval of time (receipt of sample at Mayo Clinic Laboratories to results available) taking into account standard setup days and weekends. The first day is the time that it typically takes for a result to be available. The last day is the time it might take, accounting for any necessary repeated testing.

1 to 3 days

Specimen Retention Time
Outlines the length of time after testing that a specimen is kept in the laboratory before it is discarded

14 days

Performing Laboratory Location
Indicates the location of the laboratory that performs the test

Rochester

Fees
Several factors determine the fee charged to perform a test. Contact your U.S. or International Regional Manager for information about establishing a fee schedule or to learn more about resources to optimize test selection.

  • Authorized users can sign in to Test Prices for detailed fee information.
  • Clients without access to Test Prices can contact Customer Service 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Prospective clients should contact their Regional Manager. For assistance, contact Customer Service.

Test Classification
Provides information regarding the medical device classification for laboratory test kits and reagents. Tests may be classified as cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and used per manufacturer instructions, or as products that do not undergo full FDA review and approval, and are then labeled as an Analyte Specific Reagent (ASR) product.

This test was developed, and its performance characteristics determined by Mayo Clinic in a manner consistent with CLIA requirements. This test has not been cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

CPT Code Information
Provides guidance in determining the appropriate Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code(s) information for each test or profile. The listed CPT codes reflect Mayo Clinic Laboratories interpretation of CPT coding requirements. It is the responsibility of each laboratory to determine correct CPT codes to use for billing.

CPT codes are provided by the performing laboratory.

84630

Test Setup Resources

Setup Files
Test setup information contains test file definition details to support order and result interfacing between Mayo Clinic Laboratories and your Laboratory Information System.

Excel | Pdf

Sample Reports
Normal and Abnormal sample reports are provided as references for report appearance.

Normal Reports | Abnormal Reports

SI Sample Reports
International System (SI) of Unit reports are provided for a limited number of tests. These reports are intended for international account use and are only available through MayoLINK accounts that have been defined to receive them.

SI Normal Reports | SI Abnormal Reports