Test Catalog

Test Id : NIUC

Nickel/Creatinine Ratio, Random, Urine

Useful For
Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Measurement of nickel concentration for biomonitoring nickel exposure

Special Instructions
Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test

Method Name
A short description of the method used to perform the test

Only orderable as part of a profile. For more information see NIUCR / Nickel/Creatinine Ratio, Random, Urine.

 

Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)

NY State Available
Indicates the status of NY State approval and if the test is orderable for NY State clients.

Yes

Reporting Name
Lists a shorter or abbreviated version of the Published Name for a test

Nickel/Creat Ratio, U

Aliases
Lists additional common names for a test, as an aid in searching

NIUC

Specimen Type
Describes the specimen type validated for testing

Urine

Specimen Required
Defines the optimal specimen required to perform the test and the preferred volume to complete testing

Only orderable as part of a profile. For more information see NIUCR / Nickel/Creatinine Ratio, Random, Urine.

 

Patient Preparation: High concentrations of gadolinium and iodine are known to interfere with most metal tests. If gadolinium- or iodine-containing contrast media has been administered, a specimen should not be collected for 96 hours.

Supplies: Urine Tubes, 10 mL (T068)

Container/Tube: Plastic, 10-mL urine tube or clean, plastic aliquot container with no metal cap or glued insert

Specimen Volume: 3 mL

Collection Instructions:

1. Collect a random urine specimen

2. See Trace Metals Analysis Specimen Collection and Transport in Special Instructions for complete instructions.

Special Instructions
Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test

Specimen Minimum Volume
Defines the amount of sample necessary to provide a clinically relevant result as determined by the Testing Laboratory

1.2 mL

Reject Due To
Identifies specimen types and conditions that may cause the specimen to be rejected

  All specimens will be evaluated at Mayo Clinic Laboratories for test suitability.

Specimen Stability Information
Provides a description of the temperatures required to transport a specimen to the performing laboratory, alternate acceptable temperatures are also included

Specimen Type Temperature Time Special Container
Urine Refrigerated (preferred) 28 days
Ambient 28 days
Frozen 28 days

Useful For
Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Measurement of nickel concentration for biomonitoring nickel exposure

Clinical Information
Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

Nickel (Ni) is a highly abundant element with a silvery-white appearance. Nickel is frequently combined with other metals to form alloys and is essential for the catalytic activity of some plant and bacterial enzymes but has no known role in humans. Most nickel is used to make stainless steel.

 

Nickel and its compounds have no characteristic odor or taste. Ni compounds are used for Ni plating, to color ceramics, to make some batteries, and as catalysts that increase the rate of chemical reactions. One of the most toxic Ni compounds is nickel carbonyl, Ni(CO)4, which is used as a catalyst in petroleum refining and in the plastics industry, is frequently employed in the production of metal alloys (which are popular for their anticorrosive and hardness properties), in nickel-cadmium rechargeable batteries, and is used as a catalyst in hydrogenation of oils. Ni(CO)4 is very toxic.

 

Occupational exposure to Ni occurs primarily via inhalation of Ni compounds. Inhalation of dust high in Ni content has been associated with development of lung and nasal cancer.

 

Food is the major source of exposure to Ni. Foods naturally high in Ni include chocolate, soybeans, nuts, and oatmeal. Individuals may also be exposed to Ni by breathing air, drinking water, or smoking tobacco containing nickel. Stainless steel and coins contain Ni. Some jewelry is plated with Ni or made from Ni alloys. Patients may be exposed to Ni in implanted devices including joint prostheses, sutures, clips, and screws made from Ni-containing alloys.

 

The most common harmful health effect of Ni in humans is an allergic reaction. Approximately 10% to 20% of the population is sensitive to it. The most serious harmful health effects from exposure to Ni, such as chronic bronchitis, reduced lung function, and cancer of the lung and nasal sinus, have occurred in people who have breathed dust containing certain Ni compounds while working in Ni refineries or Ni-processing plants. Urine is the specimen of choice for the determination of Ni exposure, but serum concentrations can be used to verify an elevated urine concentration.

 

Patients undergoing dialysis are exposed to Ni and accumulate Ni in blood and other organs; there appear to be no adverse health effects from this exposure. Hypernickelemia has been observed in patients undergoing renal dialysis. At the present time, this is considered to be an incidental finding as no correlation with toxic events has been identified. Routine monitoring of patients undergoing dialysis is currently not recommended.

Reference Values
Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

Only orderable as part of a profile. For more information see NIUCR / Nickel/Creatinine Ratio, Random, Urine.

 

Not applicable

Interpretation
Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

Values of 3.8 mcg/g creatinine and higher for male patients, or 4.3 mcg/g creatinine and higher for female patients, represent possible environmental or occupational exposure to nickel (Ni).

 

Ni concentrations above 50 mcg/g creatinine are of concern, suggesting excessive exposure.

 

Hypernickelemia, in the absence of exposure, may be an incidental finding or could be due to specimen contamination.

Cautions
Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

Specimen collection procedures for nickel (Ni) require special collection containers, rigorous attention to ultraclean specimen collection and handling procedures, and analysis in an ultraclean facility. Unless all of these procedures are followed, increased urinary Ni results may be an incidental and misleading finding.

 

This test cannot determine the source compound (eg, Ni sulfate) responsible for the exposure.

Clinical Reference
Recommendations for in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Moreno ME, Acosta-Saavedra LC, Mez-Figueroa D, et al: Biomonitoring of metal in children living in a mine tailings zone in Southern Mexico: A pilot study. Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2010;213:252-258. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2010.03.005.

2. Schulz C, Angerer J, Ewers U, Heudorf U, Wilhelm M, Human Biomonitoring Commission of the German Federal Environment Agency: Revised and new reference values for environmental pollutants in urine or blood of children in Germany derived from the German Environmental Survey on Children 2003-2006 (GerES IV). Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2009;212:637-647. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2009.05.003.

3. US Department of Health and Human Services: Toxicological profile for nickel. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. HHS; 2005. Accessed 03/2020. Available at: www.atsdr.cdc.gov/ToxProfiles/tp15.pdf

4. Rifai N, Horvath AR, Wittwer CT, eds: Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics. 6th ed. Elsevier; 2018

Special Instructions
Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test

Method Description
Describes how the test is performed and provides a method-specific reference

This assay is performed on an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. Calibrating standards and blanks are diluted with an aqueous acidic diluent containing internal standards. Quality control specimens and patient samples are diluted in an identical manner. The mass range from 1 amu to 263 amu is rapidly scanned multiple times and ion counts tabulated for each mass of interest. Instrument response is defined by the linear relationship of analyte concentration versus ion count ratio (analyte ion count/internal standard ion count). Analyte concentrations are derived by reading the ion count ratio for each mass of interest and determining the concentration from the response line.(Unpublished Mayo method)

PDF Report
Indicates whether the report includes an additional document with charts, images or other enriched information

No

Day(s) Performed
Outlines the days the test is performed. This field reflects the day that the sample must be in the testing laboratory to begin the testing process and includes any specimen preparation and processing time before the test is performed. Some tests are listed as continuously performed, which means that assays are performed multiple times during the day.

Thursday

Specimen Retention Time
Outlines the length of time after testing that a specimen is kept in the laboratory before it is discarded

14 days

Performing Laboratory Location
Indicates the location of the laboratory that performs the test

Rochester

Fees
Several factors determine the fee charged to perform a test. Contact your U.S. or International Regional Manager for information about establishing a fee schedule or to learn more about resources to optimize test selection.

  • Authorized users can sign in to Test Prices for detailed fee information.
  • Clients without access to Test Prices can contact Customer Service 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Prospective clients should contact their Regional Manager. For assistance, contact Customer Service.

Test Classification
Provides information regarding the medical device classification for laboratory test kits and reagents. Tests may be classified as cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and used per manufacturer instructions, or as products that do not undergo full FDA review and approval, and are then labeled as an Analyte Specific Reagent (ASR) product.

This test was developed, and its performance characteristics determined by Mayo Clinic in a manner consistent with CLIA requirements. This test has not been cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

LOINC® Information

Test Id Test Order Name Order LOINC Value
NIUC Nickel/Creat Ratio, U 13472-6
Result Id Test Result Name Result LOINC Value
Result LOINC Value Tooltip
614553 Nickel/Creat Ratio, U 13472-6

Test Setup Resources

Setup Files
Test setup information contains test file definition details to support order and result interfacing between Mayo Clinic Laboratories and your Laboratory Information System.

Excel | Pdf

Sample Reports
Normal and Abnormal sample reports are provided as references for report appearance.

Normal Reports | Abnormal Reports

SI Sample Reports
International System (SI) of Unit reports are provided for a limited number of tests. These reports are intended for international account use and are only available through MayoLINK accounts that have been defined to receive them.

SI Normal Reports | SI Abnormal Reports