TEST CATALOG ORDERING & RESULTS SPECIMEN HANDLING CUSTOMER SERVICE EDUCATION & INSIGHTS
Test Catalog

Test ID: PBOU    
Lead Occupational Exposure, Random, Urine

Useful For Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Detecting clinically significant lead exposure due to occupational exposure in random urine specimens

 

This test is not a substitute for blood lead screening.

Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

Lead toxicity primarily affects the gastrointestinal, neurologic, and hematopoietic systems. Increased urine lead concentration per gram of creatinine indicates significant lead exposure. Measurement of urine lead concentration per gram of creatinine before and after chelation therapy has been used as an indicator of significant lead exposure. An increase in lead concentration per gram of creatinine in the post-chelation specimen of up to 6 times the concentration in the pre-chelation specimen is normal.

 

Blood lead is the best clinical correlation of toxicity. For additional information, see PBDV / Lead, Venous, with Demographics, Blood.

Reference Values Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

Only orderable as part of profile. For more information see:

-PBUOE / Lead Occupational Exposure, Random, Urine

-HMUOE / Heavy Metal Occupational Exposure, with Reflex, Random, Urine

Interpretation Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

Urinary excretion of less than 4 mcg/g creatinine is not associated with any significant lead exposure.

 

Urinary excretion of more than 4 mcg/g creatinine is usually associated with pallor, anemia, and other evidence of lead toxicity.

Cautions Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

No significant cautionary statements

Clinical Reference Recommendations for in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Kosnett MJ, Wedeen RP, Rotherberg SJ, et al: Recommendations for medical management of adult lead exposure. Environ Health Perspect. 2007;115:463-471

2. De Burbane C, Buchet JP, Leroyer A, et al: Renal and neurologic effects of cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic in children: evidence of early effects and multiple interactions at environmental exposure levels. Environ Health Perspect. 2006;114:584-590

3. Strathmann FG, Blum LM: Toxic elements. In: Rafai N, Horwath AR., Wittwer CT, eds. Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics. 6th ed. Elsevier; 2018:chap 42

Special Instructions Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test