TEST CATALOG ORDERING & RESULTS SPECIMEN HANDLING CUSTOMER SERVICE EDUCATION & INSIGHTS
Test Catalog

Test ID: TRIGC    
Triglycerides, CDC, Serum

Useful For Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Measurement of triglyceride as a part of lipoprotein profiling

Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

Triglycerides are esters of the trihydric alcohol, glycerol, with 3 long-chain fatty acids. They are partly synthesized in the liver and partly derived from the diet.

Reference Values Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

Only orderable as part of a profile. For more information see LMPP / Lipoprotein Metabolism Profile, Serum.

 

Triglycerides

2-9 years:

Acceptable: <75 mg/dL

Borderline high: 75-99 mg/dL

High: > or =100 mg/dL

 

10-17 years:

Acceptable: <90 mg/dL 

Borderline high: 90-129 mg/dL

High: > or =130 mg/dL

 

> or =18 years:

Normal: <150 mg/dL

Borderline high: 150-199 mg/dL

High: 200-499 mg/dL

Very high: > or =500 mg/dL

 

Reference values have not been established for patients who are less than 2 years of age.

Interpretation Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

Increased plasma triglyceride levels are indicative of a metabolic abnormality and, along with elevated cholesterol, are considered a risk factor for atherosclerotic disease. Hyperlipidemia may be inherited or be associated with biliary obstruction, diabetes mellitus, nephrotic syndrome, renal failure, or metabolic disorders related to endocrinopathies. Increased triglycerides may also be associated with alcohol consumption, sedentarism or medication-induced (eg, prednisone).

 

Since cholesterol and triglycerides can vary independently, measurement of both is more meaningful than the measurement of cholesterol only.

Cautions Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

Triglyceride result can be falsely decreased in patients with elevated levels of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI)-a metabolite of acetaminophen, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), and metamizole.

Clinical Reference Recommendations for in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Grundy SM, Stone NJ, Bailey AL, et al: 2018 AHA/ACC/AACVPR/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/ADA/AGS/APhA/ASPC/NLA/PCNA Guideline on the Management of Blood Cholesterol: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines. Circulation. 2019 Jun 18;139(25):e1082-e1143. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.11.002.

2. Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: Expert panel on integrated guidelines for cardiovascular health and risk reduction in children and adolescents: summary report. Pediatrics. 2011 Dec;128 Suppl 5:S213-S256

3. Rosenson RS, Najera SD, Hegele RA: Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia presenting as chylomicronemia syndrome. J Clin Lipidol. 2017 Jan - Feb;11(1):294-296. doi: 10.1016/j.jacl.2016.12.005

4. Hopkins PN, Brinton EA, Nanjee MN: Hyperlipoproteinemia type 3: the forgotten phenotype. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2014 Sep;16(9):440. doi: 10.1007/s11883-014-0440-2

5. Gotoda T, Shirai K, Ohta T, et al: Diagnosis and management of type I and type V hyperlipoproteinemia. J Atheroscler Thromb. 2012;19(1):1-12

6. Gonzales KM, Donato LJ, Shah P, Simha V: Measurement of apolipoprotein B levels helps in the identification of patients at risk for hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis. J Clin Lipidol. 2021 Jan-Feb;15(1):97-103. doi: 10.1016/j.jacl.2020.11.010