Test Catalog

Test Id : CLFIB

Fibrinogen, Clauss, Plasma

Useful For
Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Detecting increased or decreased fibrinogen (factor 1) concentration of acquired or congenital origin

 

Monitoring severity and treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis

Method Name
A short description of the method used to perform the test

Only orderable as part of a profile or reflex. For more information, see:

ALBLD / Bleeding Diathesis Profile, Limited, Plasma

APROL / Prolonged Clot Time Profile, Plasma

AATHR / Thrombophilia Profile, Plasma

ADIC / Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/Intravascular Coagulation and Fibrinolysis (DIC/ICF) Profile, Plasma

ALUPP / Lupus Anticoagulant Profile, Plasma

 

Claus

NY State Available
Indicates the status of NY State approval and if the test is orderable for NY State clients.

Yes

Reporting Name
Lists a shorter or abbreviated version of the Published Name for a test

Fibrinogen, Clauss, P

Aliases
Lists additional common names for a test, as an aid in searching

Factor I

Fibrinogen (COAG)

Specimen Type
Describes the specimen type validated for testing

Plasma Na Cit

Specimen Required
Defines the optimal specimen required to perform the test and the preferred volume to complete testing

Only orderable as part of a profile or reflex. For more information, see:

ALBLD / Bleeding Diathesis Profile, Limited, Plasma

APROL / Prolonged Clot Time Profile, Plasma

AATHR / Thrombophilia Profile, Plasma

ADIC / Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/Intravascular Coagulation and Fibrinolysis (DIC/ICF) Profile, Plasma

ALUPP / Lupus Anticoagulant Profile, Plasma

Reject Due To
Identifies specimen types and conditions that may cause the specimen to be rejected

Gross hemolysis Reject
Gross lipemia Reject
Gross icterus Reject

Specimen Stability Information
Provides a description of the temperatures required to transport a specimen to the performing laboratory, alternate acceptable temperatures are also included

Specimen Type Temperature Time Special Container
Plasma Na Cit Frozen (preferred) 14 days

Useful For
Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Detecting increased or decreased fibrinogen (factor 1) concentration of acquired or congenital origin

 

Monitoring severity and treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis

Clinical Information
Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

Fibrinogen, also known as factor 1, is a plasma protein that can be transformed by thrombin into a fibrin gel ("the clot"). Fibrinogen is synthesized in the liver and circulates in the plasma as a disulfide-bonded dimer of 3 subunit chains. The biological half-life of plasma fibrinogen is 3 to 5 days.

 

An isolated deficiency of fibrinogen may be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait (afibrinogenemia or hypofibrinogenemia) and is one of the rarest of the inherited coagulation factor deficiencies.

 

Acquired causes of decreased fibrinogen levels include acute or decompensated intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis (disseminated intravascular coagulation), advanced liver disease, L-asparaginase therapy, and therapy with fibrinolytic agents (eg, streptokinase, urokinase, tissue plasminogen activator).

 

Fibrinogen function abnormalities, dysfibrinogenemias, may be inherited (congenital) or acquired. Patients with dysfibrinogenemia are generally asymptomatic. However, the congenital dysfibrinogenemias are more likely than the acquired to be associated with bleeding or thrombotic disorders. While the dysfibrinogenemias are generally not associated with clinically significant hemostasis problems, they characteristically produce a prolonged thrombin time clotting test. Congenital dysfibrinogenemias usually are inherited as autosomal codominant traits.

 

Acquired dysfibrinogenemias mainly occur in association with liver disease (eg, chronic hepatitis, hepatoma) or renal diseases associated with elevated fibrinogen levels.

 

Fibrinogen is an acute-phase reactant, so a number of acquired conditions can result in an increase in its plasma level:

-Acute or chronic inflammatory illnesses

-Nephrotic syndrome

-Liver disease and cirrhosis

-Pregnancy or estrogen therapy

-Compensated intravascular coagulation

 

The finding of an increased level of fibrinogen in a patient with obscure symptoms suggests an organic rather than a functional condition. Chronically increased fibrinogen has been recognized as a risk factor for development of arterial and venous thromboembolism.

Reference Values
Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

Only orderable as part of a profile or reflex. For more information, see:

ALBLD / Bleeding Diathesis Profile, Limited, Plasma

APROL / Prolonged Clot Time Profile, Plasma

AATHR / Thrombophilia Profile, Plasma

ADIC / Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/Intravascular Coagulation and Fibrinolysis (DIC/ICF) Profile, Plasma

ALUPP / Lupus Anticoagulant Profile, Plasma

 

Males: 200-500 mg/dL

Females: 200-500 mg/dL

In normal full-term newborns and in healthy premature infants (30-36 weeks gestation) fibrinogen is near adult levels (>150) and reaches adult levels by <21 days postnatal.

Interpretation
Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

This test assesses levels of functional (clottable) fibrinogen (see Cautions). Fibrinogen may be decreased in acquired conditions such as liver disease and acute intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis and disseminated intravascular coagulation (ICF/DIC). Fibrinogen may be decreased in rare conditions including congenital afibrinogenemia or hypofibrinogenemia. Fibrinogen may be elevated with acute or chronic inflammatory conditions.

Cautions
Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

In patients with dysfibrinogenemias, this assay may give spuriously low results.

 

In patients with markedly elevated plasma levels of fibrin degradation products (eg, thrombolytic therapy or disseminated intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis), clottable fibrinogen determined by this method may be lower than when measured by an end point method (eg, nephelometric) assay.

 

Patients with antibodies to bovine thrombin (which can arise in association with surgical application of topical bovine thrombin) may have spuriously decreased fibrinogen when assayed by this assay.

 

The presence of heparin above 1.0 U/mL may cause erroneously low kinetic estimates of fibrinogen, or make it impossible to measure fibrinogen by the nephelometric end point technique. In these cases, end point determinations of clottable fibrinogen by a gravimetric/spectrophotometric (biuret) technique or fibrinogen immunoassay may be helpful.

Clinical Reference
Recommendations for in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Dang CV, Bell WR, Shuman M: The normal and morbid biology of fibrinogen. Am J Med 1989;87:567-576

2. Bowie EJW, Owen CA Jr: Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of hemorrhagic disorders. In Disorders of Hemostasis. Edited by OD Ratnoff, CD Forbes. Philadelphia, WB Saunders Company, 1991, pp 1342-1354

3. Martinez J: Quantitative and qualitative disorders of fibrinogen. In Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. Edited by R Hoffman, EJ Benz Jr. SH Shattil, et al. New York, Churchill Livingstone, 1991, pp 1342-1354

4. Mackie IJ, Kitchen S, Machin SJ, Lowe GD: Hemostasis and Thrombosis Task Force of the British committee for standards in haematology. Guidelines for fibrinogen assays. Br H Haemotol 2003;121:396-304

Method Description
Describes how the test is performed and provides a method-specific reference

The Clauss fibrinogen assay is performed using the HemosIL Fibrinogen-C kit on the Instrumentation Laboratory ACL TOP. Patient plasma, containing fibrinogen, is mixed with reagent containing excess thrombin. The excess thrombin converts the fibrinogen in the patient plasma to fibrin. The amount of time it takes to form a clot is inversely proportional to the amount of fibrinogen present in the patient plasma.(Clauss A: Rapid physiological coagulation method in determination of fibrinogen. Acta Haematol 1957;17:237-246; Rossi E, Mondonico P, Lombardi A, Preda L: Method for the determination of functional [clottable] fibrinogen by the new family of ACL coagulometers. Thromb Res 1988;52:453-468; Hollensead SC, Triplett DA: Review of fibrinogen methods: clinical considerations. ASCP Check Specimen: 10[4] 1988 [TH 88-4]; Palareti G, Maccaferri M, Manotti C, et al: Fibrinogen assays: a collaborative study of six different methods. Clin Chem 1991;37:714-719)

PDF Report
Indicates whether the report includes an additional document with charts, images or other enriched information

No

Day(s) Performed
Outlines the days the test is performed. This field reflects the day that the sample must be in the testing laboratory to begin the testing process and includes any specimen preparation and processing time before the test is performed. Some tests are listed as continuously performed, which means that assays are performed multiple times during the day.

Monday through Friday

Report Available
The interval of time (receipt of sample at Mayo Clinic Laboratories to results available) taking into account standard setup days and weekends. The first day is the time that it typically takes for a result to be available. The last day is the time it might take, accounting for any necessary repeated testing.

1 day

Specimen Retention Time
Outlines the length of time after testing that a specimen is kept in the laboratory before it is discarded

7 days

Performing Laboratory Location
Indicates the location of the laboratory that performs the test

Rochester

Fees
Several factors determine the fee charged to perform a test. Contact your U.S. or International Regional Manager for information about establishing a fee schedule or to learn more about resources to optimize test selection.

  • Authorized users can sign in to Test Prices for detailed fee information.
  • Clients without access to Test Prices can contact Customer Service 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Prospective clients should contact their Regional Manager. For assistance, contact Customer Service.

Test Classification
Provides information regarding the medical device classification for laboratory test kits and reagents. Tests may be classified as cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and used per manufacturer instructions, or as products that do not undergo full FDA review and approval, and are then labeled as an Analyte Specific Reagent (ASR) product.

This test has been modified from the manufacturer's instructions. Its performance characteristics were determined by Mayo Clinic in a manner consistent with CLIA requirements. This test has not been cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

CPT Code Information
Provides guidance in determining the appropriate Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code(s) information for each test or profile. The listed CPT codes reflect Mayo Clinic Laboratories interpretation of CPT coding requirements. It is the responsibility of each laboratory to determine correct CPT codes to use for billing.

CPT codes are provided by the performing laboratory.

85384

Test Setup Resources

Setup Files
Test setup information contains test file definition details to support order and result interfacing between Mayo Clinic Laboratories and your Laboratory Information System.

Excel | Pdf

Sample Reports
Normal and Abnormal sample reports are provided as references for report appearance.

Normal Reports | Abnormal Reports

SI Sample Reports
International System (SI) of Unit reports are provided for a limited number of tests. These reports are intended for international account use and are only available through MayoLINK accounts that have been defined to receive them.

SI Normal Reports | SI Abnormal Reports