TEST CATALOG ORDERING & RESULTS SPECIMEN HANDLING CUSTOMER SERVICE EDUCATION & INSIGHTS
Test Catalog

Test ID: P53    
p53 Immunostain, Technical Component Only

Useful For Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Aids in the identification of neoplastic cells

Testing Algorithm Delineates situations when tests are added to the initial order. This includes reflex and additional tests.

Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

p53 is a tumor-suppressor protein. Genetic events (mutation and deletion) that affect both P53 alleles can lead to loss of cell cycle control in the setting of DNA damage, resulting in genetic instability and neoplastic transformation. Mutated p53 also has a prolonged half-life compared to wild-type p53 and, thus, accumulates in the nucleus and can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Abnormalities of the P53 gene are one of the most common genetic changes associated with cancer and can be found in a wide variety of tumor types, where they are generally associated with a worse prognosis. The p53 protein can be readily detected in a subset of cancers of the colon, stomach, bladder, breast, lung, and testes and in melanoma and lymphoma.

Interpretation Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

This test includes only technical performance of the stain (no pathologist interpretation is performed). Mayo Clinic cannot provide an interpretation of tech only stains outside the context of a pathology consultation. If an interpretation is needed, refer to PATHC / Pathology Consultation for a full diagnostic evaluation or second opinion of the case. All material associated with the case is required. Additional specific stains may be requested as part of the pathology consultation, and will be performed as necessary at the discretion of the Mayo pathologist.

 

The positive and negative controls are verified as showing appropriate immunoreactivity and documentation is retained at Mayo Clinic Rochester. If a control tissue is not included on the slide, a scanned image of the relevant quality control tissue is available upon request. Contact 855-516-8404.

 

Interpretation of this test should be performed in the context of the patient's clinical history and other diagnostic tests by a qualified pathologist.

Cautions Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

Age of a cut paraffin section can affect immunoreactivity. Stability thresholds vary widely among published literature and are antigen-dependent. Best practice is for paraffin sections to be cut fresh.

Clinical Reference Recommendations for in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. Bartley AN, Ross DW: Validation of p53 immunohistochemistry as a prognostic factor in breast cancer in clinical practice. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2002;126(4):456-458

2. Camelo-Piragua S, Jansen M, Ganguly A, et al: A sensitive and specific diagnostic panel to distinguish diffuse astrocytoma from astrocytosis: chromosome 7 gain with mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and p53. J Neropathol Exp Neurol 2011;70(2):110-115

3. Klemi PJ, Pylkkanen L, Kiilholma P, et al: p53 protein detected by immunohistochemistry as a prognostic factor in patients with epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Cancer 1995;76:1201-1208

4. Mayall FG, Goddard H, Gibbs AR: P53 immunostaining in the distinction between benign and malignant mesothelial proliferations using formalin-fixed paraffin sections. J Pathol 1992;168(4):377-381

5. van den Berg FM, Baas IO, Polak MM, Offerhaus GJ: Detection of p53 Overexpression in Routinely Paraffin-Embedded Tissue of Human Carcinomas Using a Novel Target Unmasking Fluid. Am J Pathol 1993;142(2):381-385