Test Catalog

Test Id : FERR

Ferritin, Serum

Useful For
Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Aiding in the diagnosis of iron deficiency and iron overload conditions

 

Differentiating iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease

Testing Algorithm
Delineates situations when tests are added to the initial order. This includes reflex and additional tests.

See Hereditary Hemochromatosis Algorithm in Special Instructions.

Special Instructions
Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test

Method Name
A short description of the method used to perform the test

Immunoenzymatic Assay

NY State Available
Indicates the status of NY State approval and if the test is orderable for NY State clients.

Yes

Reporting Name
Lists a shorter or abbreviated version of the Published Name for a test

Ferritin, S

Aliases
Lists additional common names for a test, as an aid in searching

Ferritin, Serum

Testing Algorithm
Delineates situations when tests are added to the initial order. This includes reflex and additional tests.

See Hereditary Hemochromatosis Algorithm in Special Instructions.

Specimen Type
Describes the specimen type validated for testing

Serum

Specimen Required
Defines the optimal specimen required to perform the test and the preferred volume to complete testing

Container/Tube:

Preferred: Serum gel

Acceptable: Red top

Specimen Volume: 0.6 mL

Collection Instructions:

1. Serum gel tubes should be centrifuged within 2 hours of collection.

2. Red-top tubes should be centrifuged and the serum aliquoted into a plastic vial within 2 hours of collection.

Special Instructions
Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test

Forms

If not ordering electronically, complete, print, and send a Benign Hematology Test Request Form (T755) with the specimen.

Specimen Minimum Volume
Defines the amount of sample necessary to provide a clinically relevant result as determined by the Testing Laboratory

0.5 mL

Reject Due To
Identifies specimen types and conditions that may cause the specimen to be rejected

Gross hemolysis Reject
Gross lipemia OK

Specimen Stability Information
Provides a description of the temperatures required to transport a specimen to the performing laboratory, alternate acceptable temperatures are also included

Specimen Type Temperature Time Special Container
Serum Refrigerated (preferred) 7 days
Frozen 90 days

Useful For
Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful

Aiding in the diagnosis of iron deficiency and iron overload conditions

 

Differentiating iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease

Testing Algorithm
Delineates situations when tests are added to the initial order. This includes reflex and additional tests.

See Hereditary Hemochromatosis Algorithm in Special Instructions.

Clinical Information
Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test

Ferritin is a large spherical protein consisting of 24 noncovalently linked subunits with a molecular weight of approximately 450,000 D. The subunits form a shell surrounding a central core containing variable amounts of ferric hydroxyphosphate. One molecule of ferritin is capable of binding between 4000 and 5000 atoms of iron, making ferritin the major iron storage protein for the body.

 

Ferritin is found chiefly in the cytoplasm of cells of the reticuloendothelial system and is a constituent of normal human serum. The concentration of ferritin is directly proportional to the total iron stores in the body, resulting in serum ferritin concentrations becoming a common diagnostic tool in the evaluation of iron status.

 

In most normal adults, serum ferritin concentrations vary with age and sex. There is a sharp rise in serum ferritin concentrations in the first month of life, coinciding with the depression of bone marrow erythropoiesis. Within 2 or 3 months, erythropoiesis becomes reactivated and there is a drop in the concentration of serum ferritin. By 6 months, the concentration is reduced to fairly low levels where they remain throughout childhood. There is no sex difference until the onset of puberty, at which time ferritin concentrations rise, particularly in males. There is a significant positive correlation between age and serum ferritin concentrations in females, but not in males.

 

Patients with iron deficiency anemia have serum ferritin concentration approximately one-tenth of normal subjects, while patients with iron overload (hemochromatosis, hemosiderosis) have serum ferritin concentrations much higher than normal. Studies also suggest that serum ferritin provides a sensitive means of detecting iron deficiency at an early stage. Serum ferritin concentrations may serve as a tool to monitor the effects of iron therapy, but results should be interpreted with caution, as these cases may not always reflect the true state of iron stores. Ferritin is a positive acute phase reactant in both adults and children, whereby chronic inflammation results in a disproportionate increase in ferritin in relation to iron reserves. Elevated ferritin is also observed in acute and chronic liver disease, chronic renal failure, and in some types of neoplastic disease.

 

Evaluating body iron stores may include serum iron determination, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and percent saturation of transferrin, however are subject to diurnal variations and may be less precise. Additionally, they do not discriminate between depleted iron stores (iron deficiency) and conditions associated with defective iron release (eg, anemia of chronic disease).

Reference Values
Describes reference intervals and additional information for interpretation of test results. May include intervals based on age and sex when appropriate. Intervals are Mayo-derived, unless otherwise designated. If an interpretive report is provided, the reference value field will state this.

Males: 24-336 mcg/L

Females: 11-307 mcg/L

Interpretation
Provides information to assist in interpretation of the test results

Hypoferritinemia is associated with increased risk for developing iron deficiency where iron deficiency is sufficient to reduce erythropoiesis causing hemoglobin concentrations to fall. Latent iron deficiency occurs when serum ferritin is low without low hemoglobin.

 

Hyperferritinemia is associated with iron overload conditions including hereditary hemochromatosis where concentrations may exceed 1000 mcg/L. Non-iron overload hyperferritinemia may be caused by common liver disorders, neoplasms, acute or chronic inflammation, and hereditary hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome.

 

For more information about hereditary hemochromatosis testing, see Hereditary Hemochromatosis Algorithm in Special Instructions.

Cautions
Discusses conditions that may cause diagnostic confusion, including improper specimen collection and handling, inappropriate test selection, and interfering substances

Ferritin is an acute phase reactant and may be elevated in patients with inflammation, liver disease, chronic infection, autoimmune disorders, and malignancy.

 

Ferritin may be elevated in excess iron storage disorders besides hemochromatosis including hemolytic anemia, sideroblastic anemia, and in those with multiple blood transfusions.

 

Race and ethnicity factors (especially in Native Africans, African Americans, and Asians) are also associated with higher mean concentrations of serum ferritin than are typical of whites, the basis of which is incompletely understood.

Clinical Reference
Recommendations for in-depth reading of a clinical nature

1. McPherson RA, Pincus MR eds: Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 21st ed. Elsevier Saunders; 2007:506

2. Cappellinin MD, Lo SF, Swickels DW: Hemoglobin, iron, bilirubin. In: Rafai N, Horvath AR, Wittwer CT, eds. Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics. 6th ed. Elsevier Saunders; 2018:719-775

Special Instructions
Library of PDFs including pertinent information and forms related to the test

Method Description
Describes how the test is performed and provides a method-specific reference

The Access Ferritin assay is a 2-site immunoenzymatic ("sandwich") assay. A sample is added to a reaction vessel with goat anti-ferritin alkaline phosphatase conjugate, and paramagnetic particles coated with goat anti-mouse: mouse anti-ferritin complexes. Serum or plasma (heparin) ferritin binds to the immobilized monoclonal anti-ferritin on the solid phase, while the goat anti-ferritin enzyme conjugate reacts with different antigenic sites on the ferritin molecules. After incubation in a reaction vessel, materials bound to the solid phase are held in a magnetic field while unbound materials are washed away. Then, the chemiluminescent substrate Lumi-Phos* 530 is added to the vessel and light generated by the reaction is measured with a luminometer. The light production is directly proportional to the concentration of ferritin in the sample. The amount of analyte in the sample is determined from a stored, multipoint calibration curve.(Package insert: DxI Reagent. Beckman Coulter Inc;11/2019)

PDF Report
Indicates whether the report includes an additional document with charts, images or other enriched information

No

Day(s) Performed
Outlines the days the test is performed. This field reflects the day that the sample must be in the testing laboratory to begin the testing process and includes any specimen preparation and processing time before the test is performed. Some tests are listed as continuously performed, which means that assays are performed multiple times during the day.

Monday through Sunday

Report Available
The interval of time (receipt of sample at Mayo Clinic Laboratories to results available) taking into account standard setup days and weekends. The first day is the time that it typically takes for a result to be available. The last day is the time it might take, accounting for any necessary repeated testing.

Same day/1 to 3 days

Specimen Retention Time
Outlines the length of time after testing that a specimen is kept in the laboratory before it is discarded

7 days

Performing Laboratory Location
Indicates the location of the laboratory that performs the test

Rochester

Fees
Several factors determine the fee charged to perform a test. Contact your U.S. or International Regional Manager for information about establishing a fee schedule or to learn more about resources to optimize test selection.

  • Authorized users can sign in to Test Prices for detailed fee information.
  • Clients without access to Test Prices can contact Customer Service 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Prospective clients should contact their Regional Manager. For assistance, contact Customer Service.

Test Classification
Provides information regarding the medical device classification for laboratory test kits and reagents. Tests may be classified as cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and used per manufacturer instructions, or as products that do not undergo full FDA review and approval, and are then labeled as an Analyte Specific Reagent (ASR) product.

This test has been cleared, approved, or is exempt by the US Food and Drug Administration and is used per manufacturer's instructions. Performance characteristics were verified by Mayo Clinic in a manner consistent with CLIA requirements.

CPT Code Information
Provides guidance in determining the appropriate Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code(s) information for each test or profile. The listed CPT codes reflect Mayo Clinic Laboratories interpretation of CPT coding requirements. It is the responsibility of each laboratory to determine correct CPT codes to use for billing.

CPT codes are provided by the performing laboratory.

82728

LOINC® Information

Test Id Test Order Name Order LOINC Value
FERR Ferritin, S 20567-4
Result Id Test Result Name Result LOINC Value
Result LOINC Value Tooltip
FERR Ferritin, S 20567-4

Test Setup Resources

Setup Files
Test setup information contains test file definition details to support order and result interfacing between Mayo Clinic Laboratories and your Laboratory Information System.

Excel | Pdf

Sample Reports
Normal and Abnormal sample reports are provided as references for report appearance.

Normal Reports | Abnormal Reports

SI Sample Reports
International System (SI) of Unit reports are provided for a limited number of tests. These reports are intended for international account use and are only available through MayoLINK accounts that have been defined to receive them.

SI Normal Reports | SI Abnormal Reports